A Health-Monitoring Sticker Powered by Your Cell Phone

August 3, 2016: Read article in MIT Technology Review. John Rogers at the University of Illinois has created a stretchy patch of artificial skin which can monitor heart rate and UV exposure. This development represents an advancement in the medical trend of “wearables,” that is, health devices which one can...

Podcast: The Altered State

July 13, 2016. Listen on Soundcloud. This podcast from “Flash Forward” explores the physical and ethical reasons for and against legalizing various pharmaceutical products, including performance enhancing drugs and illegal drugs such as marijuana and...

Immortality Quest Aims to Preserve Brain 100 Years

February 5, 2015: Read article in Discovery News. Neuroscientists are pursuing new methods which could allow humans to preserve and then revive their brains long after the body has died. “I am virtually certain that mind uploading is possible,” neuroscientist and Brain Preservation Foundation president Ken Hayworth told Scientific American’s Michael Shermer recently. “We are destined to eventually replace our biological bodies and minds with optimally designed synthetic...

Beyond Resveratrol: The Anti-Aging NAD Fad

March 11, 2015: Read article in Scientific American. A prominent theory of aging holds that decaying of mitochondria is a key driver of aging. While it’s not clear why our mitochondria fade as we age, evidence suggests that it leads to everything from heart failure to neurodegeneration, as well as the complete absence of zipping around the supper table. Recent research suggests it may be possible to reverse mitochondrial decay with dietary supplements that increase cellular levels of a molecule called NAD (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide). But caution is due: While there’s promising test-tube data and animal research regarding NAD boosters, no human clinical results on them have been...

First Monkeys with Autism Created in China

January 25, 2015: Read article in MIT Technology Review. Scientists in China say they used genetic engineering to create monkeys with a version of autism, and they now plan to attempt to reverse the symptoms by erasing the genetic error in live animals using new genome-editing technologies such as CRISPR. They hope that this work will one day lead to a cure for autism and change the way we study human disabilities. However, their research raises several ethical questions related to genetic engineering and animal welfare, as well as practical considerations over how accurate a model of autism their genetically engineered monkeys...